What we read this week (30 August)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Research, data, publishing and promotion of research

 

Privacy

Innovation

  • Brittni Bowering on what happens after you run a design sprint –  Design sprints need iteration
    “An iteration sprint is a simplified version of the first design sprint week where we take all the feedback and insights from the user tests and make small (or big) changes to the idea. This gives us the time and framework to rework the solution and bring it closer to something that the target user would love to use. The outcomes were overwhelmingly positive—so now, these are a crucial part of our design sprint process.”
  • Also on design sprints Stéphane Cruchon looks at How to Make Design Sprints Work at Big Companies. “How, in this case, does one manage what comes after, and build on the positive energy of the Sprint? How to maintain that energy as everything becomes blurry, slow, bureaucratic again?” The proposed, interesting solution, is the design sprint quarter:
    The Design Sprint Quarter Timeline
  • More on design sprints in Jake Knapp’s newsletter.
  • Jeanne W. Ross, Cynthia M. Beath and Martin Mocker share some insights into how larger companies are managing ideas for innovation and learning in Creating Digital Offerings Customers Will Buy
  • NYCML Innovation Monitor considers the technological social responsibilities of companies: “The most important element of TSR: Management needs to take responsibility for technology’s impact on society at large. Once again, similarly to Corporate Social Responsbility, organizations must address the externalities of their technological decisions. They must staff C-suites accordingly and imbue this ethos at every level of the organization.”

What we read this week (21 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Data

Innovation and strategy

And finally…

Researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia, argue that shifting body posture brought about by the use of modern technology is causing young people to develop hornlike spikes at the back of their skulls — bone spurs caused by the forward tilt of the head, which shifts weight from the spine to the muscles at the back of the head, causing bone growth in the connecting tendons and ligaments.  They say smartphones and other handheld devices are contorting the human form, requiring users to bend their heads forward to make sense of what’s happening on the miniature screens. [H/T: Washington Post]

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What we read this week (30 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

Academic research and Open Science

Innovation

  • How Amazon Innovates
    “At the heart of how Amazon innovates is its six-page memo, which is required at the start of every new initiative. What makes it effective isn’t so much the structure of the document itself, but how it is used to embed a fanatical focus on the customer from day one. It’s something that is impressed upon Amazon employees early in their careers.”

Around the web

 

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