What we read this week (5 July)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Science

Blockchain

  • The bloxberg infrastructure, a secure global blockchain established by a consortium of leading research organizations to provide scientists with decentralized services worldwide, has launched. “The bloxberg Consortium aims to fosters collaboration among the global scientific community, empowering researchers with robust, autonomous services that transcend institutional boundaries. For example, with consented transactions on the bloxberg infrastructure, research claims need not be limited to one institution alone, but can be confirmed by the whole trusted network.”
  • BMJ’s Helen King has an excellent round-up of publishing related blockchain projects,  Blockchain in Publishing and Open Science, What’s the state of play?
  •  The Blockchain for Peer Review initiative and Publons are organizing a seminar to discuss the following:
    • Can we develop common standards in order to improve the transparency, efficiency, recognition and transportability of the peer review process?
    • What is the ideal technology and infrastructure to achieve that, and how can we prevent the duplication of effort? Is blockchain the preferred solution, or would we prefer centralized services? Or perhaps a combination of the two?

And finally…

John shares his take on what makes the difference between success and failure: “Objectives and Key Results, or OKRs, are a simple goal-setting system and they work for organizations, they work for teams, they even work for individuals. The objectives are what you want to have accomplished. The key results are how I’m going to get that done. Objectives. Key results. What and how. But here’s the truth: many of us are setting goals wrong, and most of us are not setting goals at all. A lot of organizations set objectives and meet them. They ship their sales, they introduce their new products, they make their numbers, but they lack a sense of purpose to inspire their teams.”

What we read this week (22 March)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Science and Open data

Innovation

  • David Caswell from BBC News Labs on Editorial innovation in news and the dangers of assuming that the future of news will be inevitably technical.
  • Harold DeMonaco et al. look at medical innovation by patients arguing a richer set of available medical innovation options will benefit patients, commercial medical caregivers, producers, and society at large.
  • Nesta’s Compendium of Innovation Methods includes information and inspiration about Accelerator programmes, Anticipatory regulation, Challenge prizes, Crowdfunding, Experimentation, Futures, Impact investment, Innovation mapping, People Powered Results: the 100 day challenge, Prototyping, Public and social innovation labs, Scaling grants for social innovations, Standards of Evidence

Other links

What we read this week (27 July 2018)

Here’s the round-up of what we’ve been reading this week written before the UK heatwave begins to turn our ‘naturally ventilated’ office into an oven and our brains to mush.

Publishing

  • Sally Rumsey, Head of Scholarly Communications & Research Data Management at the Bodleian Libraries explains how complicated research sharing processes hurt the interests of authors, scholarly societies and publishers.

Crowdsourcing, crowdfunding and open science

  • Enago Academy write about G-Med, the world’s largest community for physicians.  G-Med wants to promote digital global collaboration between physicians in order to improve and shorten diagnostics, improve clinical trials, and increase knowledge and practice methods.
  • We also came across Therapoid and the Knowbella Platform this week. Therapoid, from Open Therapeutics, aims to facilitate and enable collaboration among life science researchers.  The platform includes a preprint server for open access publishing, open data and a system for managing grant funds via blockchain. Whilst  the Knowbella Platform, a researcher community for open source IP projects. Is doing something similar and aims to make use of the $4T of idle intellectual property  languishing in institutions, universities, and companies by allowing scientists to develop it into new directions and applications.
  • In the same space, Scienceroot wants to help science flourish and why invest in their Initial Token Offering. They are trying to bring together  time stamped scientific repositories, crowdfunding service and a collaboration platform.

Product Development

Future thinking

What we read this week (20 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

First up are two pieces about Crossref. Christine Cormack Wood’s post on the SciELO blog summarises why Crossref exists and persists and Enago Academy,  as part of their interview series on Connecting Scholarly Publishing Experts and Researchers, ask Crossref team how they add value to research outputs and explains the important work Crossref does. Continue reading “What we read this week (20 July 2018)”

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