What we read this week (2 August)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Health Technology

  • KQ Labs, an intensive accelerator programme offered to high growth potential startup teams in the area of data-driven biomedical science, has opened up applications. Apply by 15 September.

User experience

 

Innovation

And finally…

A new approach to copyright – copying allowed providing you only write it out in green crayon :-):

What we read this week (21 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Data

Innovation and strategy

And finally…

Researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia, argue that shifting body posture brought about by the use of modern technology is causing young people to develop hornlike spikes at the back of their skulls — bone spurs caused by the forward tilt of the head, which shifts weight from the spine to the muscles at the back of the head, causing bone growth in the connecting tendons and ligaments.  They say smartphones and other handheld devices are contorting the human form, requiring users to bend their heads forward to make sense of what’s happening on the miniature screens. [H/T: Washington Post]

Figure 1

What we read this week (30 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

Academic research and Open Science

Innovation

  • How Amazon Innovates
    “At the heart of how Amazon innovates is its six-page memo, which is required at the start of every new initiative. What makes it effective isn’t so much the structure of the document itself, but how it is used to embed a fanatical focus on the customer from day one. It’s something that is impressed upon Amazon employees early in their careers.”

Around the web

 

What we read this week (13 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about.

The future of scientific article formats

Following on from James Somers excellent piece in the Atlantic about the future of scientific papers.  Luis Pedro Coelho has put together a more pessimistic, but probably more realistic, response suggesting that the future of the scientific papers is probably a PDF. In a slightly older post Björn Brembs outlines the seven functionalities that he thinks the scholarly literature should have. Björn makes some good suggestions and submission should be easier.  We did some experiments many years ago with a “people who read this article also read this” service but it was a flop. TrendMD’s more sophisticated recommendation algorithms work much better for BMJ. How to best support for TDM is something we would really like input from the community on.  Continue reading “What we read this week (13 April 2018)”

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