What we read this week (22 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Blockchain

UX

  • Fascinating bit of work by Iterable presenting the user engagement journey timelines for the top US newspapers:

AI

  • Open AI have released an analysis showing that “since 2012, the amount of compute used in the largest AI training runs has been increasing exponentially with a 3.4-month doubling time (by comparison, Moore’s Law had a 2-year doubling period). Since 2012, this metric has grown by more than 300,000x (a 2-year doubling period would yield only a 7x increase). Improvements in compute have been a key component of AI progress, so as long as this trend continues, it’s worth preparing for the implications of systems far outside today’s capabilities”.
  • The New powers, new responsibilities. A global survey of journalism and artificial intelligence is a fantastic report which has come out of a collaboration between LSE’s Polis and the Google News Initiative to foster literacy in newsrooms about artificial intelligence.

Watch the video summmary: https://youtu.be/p-DGp1ot0EE
Lots of interesting applications:

What we read this week (6 September)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Peer review

  • Elsevier Connect has a write up of the  Elsevier’s Research Funders Summit in Combating bias, preserving research integrity – it’s all part of scientific review including the following comment from Dr. Sally Amero at NIH: “Some of the things we’re dealing with now include threats and bribes to reviewers or against reviewers … cabals and networks of people across the country who are looking out for each other’s welfare, embellished bio sketches, reciprocal and requested favors. Incomplete conflict of interest certifications is becoming more and more of a concern. Leaks of information before the meeting, inappropriate access to our secure review site, and applications being shared outside of our review meeting.”

Discovery

Conferences and dissemination

And finally…

Great article about statistics in the New Yorker. It covers Shipman, statins, and aspirin:

“The dangers of making individual predictions from our collective characteristics were aptly demonstrated in a deal struck by the French lawyer André-François Raffray in 1965. He agreed to pay a ninety-year-old woman twenty-five hundred francs every month until her death, whereupon he would take possession of her apartment in Arles.

At the time, the average life expectancy of French women was 74.5 years, and Raffray, then forty-seven, no doubt thought he’d negotiated himself an auspicious contract. Unluckily for him, as Bill Bryson recounts in his new book, “The Body,” the woman was Jeanne Calment, who went on to become the oldest person on record. She survived for thirty-two years after their deal was signed, outliving Raffray, who died at seventy-seven. By then, he had paid more than twice the market value for an apartment he would never live in.”

What we read this week (21 December)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Research

Innovation/Product management

Future thinking

And finally…

The 12 Best Computer Science Books of 2018 from @StephenPuiszis

Best Computer Science Books of 2018

What we read this week (28 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and peer review

Continue reading “What we read this week (28 September 2018)”

What we read this week (20 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

First up are two pieces about Crossref. Christine Cormack Wood’s post on the SciELO blog summarises why Crossref exists and persists and Enago Academy,  as part of their interview series on Connecting Scholarly Publishing Experts and Researchers, ask Crossref team how they add value to research outputs and explains the important work Crossref does. Continue reading “What we read this week (20 July 2018)”

What we read this week (13 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

OpenCitations announced the release of the Crossref Open Citation Index (#COCI) which contains open DOI-to-DOI citations extracted from Crossref. Crossref’s really useful participation reports show what percentage of a publisher’s content has 10 key metadata elements registered. Going through BMJ’s report we found out that some of our reference deposits are failing and we need to resubmit 🙁

Continue reading “What we read this week (13 July 2018)”

Things we read this week (12 January 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Continue reading “Things we read this week (12 January 2018)”

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