What we read this week (30 August)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Research, data, publishing and promotion of research

 

Privacy

Innovation

  • Brittni Bowering on what happens after you run a design sprint –  Design sprints need iteration
    “An iteration sprint is a simplified version of the first design sprint week where we take all the feedback and insights from the user tests and make small (or big) changes to the idea. This gives us the time and framework to rework the solution and bring it closer to something that the target user would love to use. The outcomes were overwhelmingly positive—so now, these are a crucial part of our design sprint process.”
  • Also on design sprints Stéphane Cruchon looks at How to Make Design Sprints Work at Big Companies. “How, in this case, does one manage what comes after, and build on the positive energy of the Sprint? How to maintain that energy as everything becomes blurry, slow, bureaucratic again?” The proposed, interesting solution, is the design sprint quarter:
    The Design Sprint Quarter Timeline
  • More on design sprints in Jake Knapp’s newsletter.
  • Jeanne W. Ross, Cynthia M. Beath and Martin Mocker share some insights into how larger companies are managing ideas for innovation and learning in Creating Digital Offerings Customers Will Buy
  • NYCML Innovation Monitor considers the technological social responsibilities of companies: “The most important element of TSR: Management needs to take responsibility for technology’s impact on society at large. Once again, similarly to Corporate Social Responsbility, organizations must address the externalities of their technological decisions. They must staff C-suites accordingly and imbue this ethos at every level of the organization.”

What we read this week (28 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Social Media

And finally…

What we read this week (8 February)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

  • First up are two articles about commenting. The Ringer has a piece about ‘how the New York Times Cooking became the best comments section on the Internet‘ by calling the section Notes. ““The call to action was to leave a note on the recipe that helps make it better. That’s very different from ‘Leave a comment on a recipe.’”  PLOS, on the other hand, are struggling to attract comments. A new study in the Journal of Information Science found “that publishers are yet to encourage significant numbers of readers to leave comments, with implications for the effectiveness of commenting as a means of collecting and communicating community perceptions of an article’s importance.” (H/T: InfoDocket). Perhaps a tweak to the wording asking for notes rather than comments might help?

Innovation

 

 

Effect of different financial competing interest statements on readers’ perceptions of clinical educational articles: a randomised controlled trial

Our RCT on the effect of various COI statements on readers’ confidence in educational articles has just been published in BMJ Open. Conclusion:

“Doctors’ confidence in educational articles was not influenced by the COI statements. Further work is required to determine if doctors do not perceive these COIs as important in educational articles or if they do not pay attention to these statements. More meaningful COI disclosure practices may be needed, which highlight context-specific potential sources of bias to readers.”

Read the full article

What we read this week (28 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and peer review

Continue reading “What we read this week (28 September 2018)”

What we read this week (14 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Peer review

Artificial intelligence and machine learning

Continue reading “What we read this week (14 September 2018)”

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