What we read this week (12 July)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Product development and innovation

Technology

 

And finally…

  • Katie Sehl writes about Canadian doctors prescribing a visit to the art museum for patients to reduce stress and anxiety and increase feelings of well-being. In a partnership between the Médecins Francophones du Canada (MFdC) and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts physicians have been given prescription slips that patients can present at the ticket booth for entry.  Which reminds me that the Barbican has an exhibition on at the moment called AI: More than Human that looks like it’s worth a visit. The website claims,“this major centre-wide ‘festival-style’ exhibition explores creative and scientific developments in AI, demonstrating its potential to revolutionise our lives. Bringing together artists, scientists and researchers, this interactive exhibition offers an unprecedented survey of AI with which you are invited to engage head-on.”

Things we read this week (5 January 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

  • Research Workflows
    Investing in researcher workflow tools is an obvious next step for publishers seeking to increase revenues. It’s not hard to imagine, as Roger C. Schonfeld does, a future world in which Institutions drift into buying bundles of products and services alongside their institutional subscriptions. I think it’s more useful to follow Hax’s Delta model (see below) and think of these as total customer solutions strategies rather than lock-in strategies. A bundle which includes journal subscriptions, a research evaluation tool, an institutional repository and a reference management tool thrown in for free is likely to be cheaper and more efficient than purchasing and running all of those products from different vendors. Although this is likely to lead to lock-in/competitor lock-out.
    The “Delta Model” of Arnoldo Hax ...Not sure what Researcher Workflows are? Terry Clague also has a useful post trying to define the term “researcher workflow”.  LabWorm’s roundup of the Top 17 trending research tools/sites of 2017 that were most appreciated and used by the LabWorm community is an interesting insight into what researchers are actually using. (H/T: @pluto_network). Not on LabWorm’s list is ContentMine  which claims to provide tools for getting papers from many online sources, normalising them, then processing them to lookup and/or search for key terms, phrases, patterns, statements, and more – something to try next week.

Continue reading “Things we read this week (5 January 2018)”

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑