What we read this week (6 December)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

AI and Machine Learning

Product Management

  • Continuous Foresight: Your Business Plan is Science Fiction
    Cool idea: “Why should a business utilize science fiction? What do you think your business plan is? That’s the message of Brian David Johnson, a leading expert on science fiction prototyping and threatcasting. Threatcasting is a sub-genre of forecast that details future threats and how the organization can track threat development and know when to respond. Brian David Johnson joins Continuous Foresight to walk us through why threatcasting is effective and how you can use it in your forecasting work.”

And finally…

 

What we read this week (29 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Rupert Murdoch and try your hand at being a troll

  • The Sun King by David Dimbleby  is a fascinating listen that reveals how Murdoch built his empire. The series examines his war on the print unions, the phone-hacking scandal and his relationships with political leaders, from his lunch at Chequers with Margaret Thatcher in 1981 while he was trying to buy The Times, to the role of Fox News in the election of Donald Trump.
  • The Troll Factory is fun.Try your hand at growing your influence on social media — by whatever means necessary. How many people can you reel in?
  • Here’s what Russia’s 2020 disinformation operations look like, according to Darren Linvill and Patrick Warren, two experts on social media and propaganda in Rolling Stone.

Product Management

And finally…

What we read this week (15 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Research culture

Innovation

  • A new study in MIT Sloan Management Review sheds light on what separates innovation leaders from laggards and the key shifts executives must make to move into the leader category ” According to our research, 83% of innovation leaders agree that it’s important to decouple data from legacy infrastructure, compared with only 37% of innovation laggards. Leaders’ adoption of critical technologies that enable decoupling outpaces that of laggards by a massive margin: 97% versus 30%. By decoupling data from infrastructure, and using flexible architectures such as microservices, these top companies are able to respond quickly to demand and can scale with ease.”
  • Innov8rs Connect are running a free virtual summit with 100+ sessions covering the best and latest in corporate innovation. 9-13 December 2019. More info via https://innov8rs.co/connect-reg/

AI

 

What we read this week (22 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Blockchain

UX

  • Fascinating bit of work by Iterable presenting the user engagement journey timelines for the top US newspapers:

AI

  • Open AI have released an analysis showing that “since 2012, the amount of compute used in the largest AI training runs has been increasing exponentially with a 3.4-month doubling time (by comparison, Moore’s Law had a 2-year doubling period). Since 2012, this metric has grown by more than 300,000x (a 2-year doubling period would yield only a 7x increase). Improvements in compute have been a key component of AI progress, so as long as this trend continues, it’s worth preparing for the implications of systems far outside today’s capabilities”.
  • The New powers, new responsibilities. A global survey of journalism and artificial intelligence is a fantastic report which has come out of a collaboration between LSE’s Polis and the Google News Initiative to foster literacy in newsrooms about artificial intelligence.

Watch the video summmary: https://youtu.be/p-DGp1ot0EE
Lots of interesting applications:

What we read this week (8 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

AI

  • Creating the Symbiotic AI Workforce of the Future demonstrates how leaders can reimagine processes to “create greater business value and prepare for the next wave of innovation. In the long-standing argument about whether AI will replace or complement human beings, the new watchword is symbiosis”.
  • Arthur “A.J.” Boston looks at what AI means for libraries.
  • Purple DS look at how AI can support editorial teams. “Editorial teams should not to be spending time building hyperlinks, auto linking products, uploading stories. That’s what AI can do. Human writers will only be supported by AI, editorial jobs will become simpler and the average quality of our articles likely even better.”

Open source

Digital ethics

  • Sarah Burnett, Executive Vice President & Distinguished Analyst, Everest Group asks What is your company’s digital ethics score? “Every company today must have an evolving ethical digital strategy in order to restore trust among their consumers. Lofty and hollow corporate social responsibility statements won’t work. To change consumer sentiment, you need to put solid, trust-instilling policies into practice. “

Search and knowledge graphs

  • Computer Weekly on Search beyond search engines. “All-purpose search engines… have been valued at a median of US$17,530 a year (about £14,000) by 80,000 participants in a study published this year by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Groningen. Respondents were asked how much compensation they would need to give up various digital services. Search engines were valued more than twice as much as email, nearly five times as much as online maps, and more than 50 times more than social media.”
  • Luc Boruta argues that PIDs Are Not Silver Bullets “There are billions of research objects that will never be assigned a PID — e.g. works published before the advent of DOIs, and most of the works that fall under the grey literature label — and objects that were assigned PIDs are not necessarily cited with mentions of these PIDs.” and writes about how  Cobaltmetrics are extending the PID Graph.
  • Nature Index on how the growth of papers is crowding out old classics. Hard to interpret the visualization but it’s eye catching. “An analysis led by Raj Kumar Pan, a computer scientist at Alto University in Finland, found that the number of academic papers is increasing by 4% each year. The total number of citations is growing by 5.6% each year, and doubling every 12 years. According to Alexander Petersen,co-author of the study, this huge volume of new articles isn’t just reshaping scientific publishing, it’s also changing how researchers “follow the reference trail”. Rather than sift through large volumes of new papers, researchers are opting for middle-aged articles that have gained greater visibility and more citations.”

 

What we read this week (1 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

  • Thousands of grant peer reviewers share concerns in global survey “Based on a survey of 4,700 researchers worldwide — also found that recognition is an important incentive for reviewers. More than half said that they are more likely to agree to review grant applications if funders acknowledge their efforts.”
  • ROR is seeking donations. “ROR aims to raise $175,000 in donations over the next two years. As a supporter, you’ll have an opportunity to be part of this exciting community effort from the beginning and to ensure its long-term growth and success. Our first fundraising target is $75,000 by the end of 2019 in order to secure enough funds to hire a technical lead and to organize an in-person ROR Community planning meeting at PIDapalooza in January 2020. “
  • Richard Wynne comments on the Insight Report by Outsell, Inc. published in collaboration with Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) “The Scholarly Communications Ecosystem is Bracing for the Full Impact of the Digital Age”, articulates a growing unease spreading through the scholarly ecosystem. This time the barbarians really do seem to be at the gate. But even more alarming, maybe the barbarians are right!
  • In Are you TikTok ready? Andy Miah says there is a vast world of creative media that can help academics cut through the noise of the internet.

AI and Machine Learning

Podcasting

Innovation

 

 

What we read this week (25 October)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Innovation

  • Steve Blank on why Companies Do “Innovation Theater” Instead of Actual Innovation. Those who view STM publishers as not being innovative will find much to support their view here: “If the company is large enough it will become a “rent-seeker” and look to the government and regulators as their first line of defense against innovative competition. They’ll use government regulation and lawsuits to keep out new entrants with more innovative business models. The result of monopolist behavior is that innovation in that sector dies — until technology/consumer behavior passes them by. By then the company has lost the ability to compete as an innovator.”
  • This graphic from The Passion Economy and the Future of Work caught my attention. It’s awkward to think about academics as “knowledge influencers” but once you do the potential value of services like Kudos become much more obvious.

What we read this week (4 October)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

User experience

And finally…

  • Digital product agency MSCHF must have had fun building M-Journal. A website that will turn any Wikipedia article into a “real” academic article. [via @broderick]

What we read this week (20 September)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

  • Yvonne Campfens asks what does AcademicTech success look like and has created the following hypothetical model. This is version: version 1.0:
    No alt text provided for this imageThe article reminded me of Joseph Esposito’s piece on When Is a Feature a Product, and a Product a Business? on Scholarly Kitchen. My impression is that most front-end feature/service development within academic publishing is created by start-ups and then adopted by Publishers. Publishers/platform providers are innovating but it tends to be more behind the scenes and involve workflow efficiencies.
  • Having said that, Atypon are launching a new personalized content discovery, targeted content promotion and discovery tool for researchers and publishers. Filling a gap in their portfolio of services and joining services like SpringerNature’s Recommended, and Elsevier’s Mendely Suggest tools and other (currently) publisher independent tools like Researcher.
  • Hindawi introduce Phenom Review, an Open Source Scholarly Infrastructure solution, in this post. “This month, a second Hindawi journal will move onto the Phenom Review system, our new peer review platform built entirely open source. Phenom Review is part of Hindawi’s collaboration with Coko utilizing their open source PubSweet framework. This is a significant milestone because while creating a peer review system and workflow for a single journal is relatively straightforward, making it flexible enough to accommodate multiple journals is much more complex. Once we can use it effectively and efficiently for two journals, it is easy to expand to more. The migration of our remaining 230 journals is expected to be completed early in the new year.”
  • Martin Paul Eve has an excellent ‘thinking things through’ post on The Problems of Unit Costs Per Article. Also see comments on twitter. In her post, Yvonne Campfens, pointed out that although the path to success appears to be linear the reality it is very messy. Switching from subscription models to APCs is going to be messy and some more thinking around what else might happen in the ecosystem is needed. Although it’s hard to argue against transparency as a value, transparency can work both ways. One of the potential unintended consequences of APC could be that the same data is turned around to measure the unit cost/value of authors.

Medicine and research Impact

  • The Knowledge Nudge focuses on all things knowledge translation (KT) such as the science of KT, patient engagement, and media & dissemination and including this one on Knowledge brokers — often the ‘doers’ of knowledge translation — are increasingly used to close the gap between research and practice, and facilitate the development of relationships that are critical to effective knowledge translation. 
  • The Research Impact online summit is back on 21-22 October. If even this isn’t your area it’s a really interesting way to hear about researcher concerns and motivations.
  • Based On Science from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine aims to answer common, everyday questions that people have about science and human health. It uses the community of experts to provide the most up-to-date, evidence-based information about science and health questions that affect the decisions we make each day.
  • We came across Hippomedics at a conference this week. They create easy to understand medical physiology animations/videos. We liked this one about What happens when humans drink seawater?

Innovation and product management

  • All kinds of interesting innovation ‘things’ with voice tech and storytelling in the talks from ONA19.
  • Erik Starck writes about King for a Day vs Internal Hackathons. I heard Kevin Hale talk about King for a Day in another talk and it seems like a really good idea. “They pick a person at random from the employees and make her or him “King/Queen for a Day”. That person then get to decide what features to work on during the King for a Day-hackathon. The entire company gets behind the feature, from marketing to sales and R&D. At Wufoo, this lead to a boost in company morale. Everyone felt they worked on something meaningful to the product.”
  • Stuck for a way to test your idea? Steve Glaveski has come up with 12 Types of Prototypes to Test Your Idea
  • Steve Blank on AgileFall in real life and what to do about it.

What we read this week (13 September)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Research space

  • Lizzie Gadd describes how seeing research evaluation as a food chain where participants are both the evaluators and the evaluated may help us understand, and solve, some of the problems inherent within in The research evaluation food chain and how to disrupt it.
  • Daniela Duca, Product Manager at SAGE Ocean asks Who’s disrupting transcription in academia? and covers a range of tools and services used by researchers.
  • In Comment, reply, repeat: Engaging students with social annotation Alice Fleerackers, Juan Pablo Alperin, Esteban Morales, and Remi Kalir share a sneak peek of their study of student annotation using Hypothesis  on the ScholCommLab blog:students reported that annotating with hypothesis helped them learn (bar chart)
  • We came across two newish image based search engines this week,  GrepMed is an image based medical reference search engine which aims to democratize professional medical reference information through clinically relevant crowd-sourced inforgraphics and Grafiti, a search engine to discover and share charts from top publishers.

Innovation and product development

  • Jim Bilton uses data from the Media Futures benchmarking project to look at media’s biggest obstacle to innovation – technology.
  • Evidence-based profiles of roles across the translational workforce are now available through CTS-Personas, a project of the CTSA Program National Center for Data to Health (CD2H), led by Sara Gonzales at Northwestern University. Each profile details key responsibilities, motivators, goals, software use, pain points, and professional development needs. The Persona profiles cover the spectrum of the translational ecosystem, from basic science to clinical research to community implementation. Personas can be integrated locally to help inform local resources, training opportunities, and communication strategies.
  • Point Nine Capital partner Christoph Janz suggests three questions that companies should ask themselves before they choose to launch a freemium SaaS product:
    1. Does your paid plan have a gross margin of 80—90%?
    2. Does your free plan attract the right audience?
    3. Is your product inherently viral?

    Interesting read about the pros and cons and freemium business models.

And finally…

Love this Kanban cartoon and the HIPPO fast track section:

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