Interview with Trish Groves

Two MiRoR research fellows, Van Nguyen Thu (University Paris Descartes, France) and Ketevan Glonti (University of Split, Croatia) had the opportunity to interview Trish Groves, Director of Academic Outreach and Advocacy for BMJ, Editor in Chief of the online journal BMJ Open, and Honorary Deputy Editor of The BMJ.

Open peer review, data sharing, research misconduct, journal impact factors, patient involvement, are among the topics covered in this inspiring interview. 

Visit Miror website for full interview

How to listen to BMJ articles using Firefox

Hat tip to M.G. Siegler for alerting us to the narrate feature in Firefox. To listen to a BMJ article in Firefox:

  1. Go to a BMJ article for example: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/12/e017917
  2. Go to the Reader View by clicking on the Reader View reader mode icon 57 icon in the address bar
  3. Then click on the “Narrate” button on the left hand side
  4. Listen and visually follow along to the text. You can change the voice to have a British or American accent.

 

9 articles published in The BMJ & BMJ Journals feature in the Altmetric Top 100 research articles!

9 articles published from The BMJ & BMJ Journals feature in the Altmetric Top 100 research articles this year! The Top 100 is an annually released list of academic papers that have received the most attention in the previous year from sources tracked by data science company Altmetric. This includes coverage in the mainstream media, shares and discussions on social networks and blogs, references in Wikipedia and public policy documents, and comments on post-publication peer-review forums.

You can view Altmetric’s full list here and listen to the Altmetric podcast here!

Preparing to handle dynamic scholarly content: Are we ready?

Historically, journals might expect a few ‘Letters to the Editor” to discuss ‘matters arising’ after an article was published. But scholarly communications are becoming much more dynamic, with versions posted as ‘preprints’ before publication, corrections after publication, and potentially multiple versions of the same study appearing at different times. How should we handle this changing landscape for the benefits of researchers and consumers of the literature?

Download the slides from Theo Bloom’s (Executive Editor, The BMJ) talk at Crossref Live 2017 in Singapore

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑