What we read this week (11 May 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about.

Measuring impact and usage

Melissa Grant, Lucy Vernall and Kirsty Hill have measured the impact of health-related research broadcast on prime time television and found that participants’ understanding of the issues had been enhanced and some had changed their behaviours as a result of the research (research paper here).

Digital Science have a new report which found that policy makers make up the primary community engaging with Malaria research, whilst practitioners and mainstream news outlets were most prominent for Alzheimer’s disease. Also from Digital Science, Jean Liu and Euan Adie talk about the ideas that underpin Altmetric.com and the company’s role in providing responsible metrics in this podcast.

Lorraine Estelle of COUNTER, Stuart Maxwell of Scholarly IQ, and Iris Hanney of Unlimited Priorities discuss COUNTER credentialing and how the COUNTER standards allow libraries and publishers to assess value in the Authority File podcast. There’s also a fascinating insight into how COUNTER came into being.

Redesings

The New York Times has a new design for its article page with a single-column layout that strips away clutter. “It was the first time we were able to have a unified experience for readers and advertisers from the beginning. I and my team sat side by side with product design, newsroom reps.” Google is revamping Google News with a new design that will incorporate elements of the Newsstand app and YouTube. Finally, Òscar Oto provides some practical advice about three design thinking techniques that provide specific, focused, and weighted feedback for gathering data ahead of doing a redesign.

Apps and digital editions

Dan Amos has a good summary of Google I/O and how it will impact app development. The Global Editors Network and Twipe have a new report about ‘Reinventing Digital Editions’ to understand the best practices of successful digital-only editions.

Richard Holden,  Product Manager for mobile apps @TheEconomist writes about how the new mobile app for The Economist has been designed to deliver what users want.

Quick links

And finally…

It would be hard to round up the week without mentioning Google’s new assistant that can make phone calls on your behalf.

 

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

What we read this week (4 May 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about.

Publishing

The Harvard Digital Publishing Collaborative explore what publishing production and editorial functions can learn from how software developers with Andrew Savikas, former CEO of Safari  who also ran the Tools of Change for Publishing conferences. Andrew talks about the difficulties of XML first workflows and newer approaches which particularly resonated with us.

Iain Cheeseman is advocating for publishing peer review and presents a number arguments in favor of transparent peer review. Molly Flatt reports on how Taylor & Francis have used Unsilo to  make relevant book suggestions and achieve conversion rate just under 20%.

Roger C. Schonfeld is thinking about how to create a  truly seamless platform for academic publishing and what this means for publisher platforms whilst the 1findr service from  1science is trying to create this discovery platform using harvesters that automatically collect, parse, complete and validate metadata from information online.

A new paper by Nir Grinberg identifies five types of reading behaviors: “Scan,” “Read,” “Read (long),” “Idle,” and “Shallow” and how they vary across different types of articles, sites, and mobile and nonmobile devices. At some point we’ll have a go at  applying this to our articles to see if it matches our expectations.

Healthcare

Mark Skilton writes about seven technologies that will revolutionise healthcare.

 

Experimentation and Creativity

Matthew Monahan from Arc Publishing talks about how they are using technology experiments to drive growth at The Washington Post:

Outfast Source has a nice article about making an MVP part of your development strategy. Bethan Jinkinson from BBC Ideas reflects on what they have learnt so far, basically that there is an audience for informative short-form factual digital video. Finally, the Harvard Business Review finally finds evidence to support the saying “Write drunk, edit sober”  in an article about how drunk People Are Better at Creative Problem Solving.

 

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

What we read this week (27 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. It’s an eclectic mix this week:

Publishing:

We’re really interested to see how the FT’s experiment with :CRUX to use Knowledge Acquisition as an approach to content recommendation will work out. We could see this approach working well for some of our audience segments.

Other things that caught our interest included, David Matthews writing about the split over how publishers should tackle ResearchGate, Ruth Wells is thinking about applying agile to publishing processes outside of Tech Departments, Ryan Regier’s flowchart looking at how at to manage access to unsubscribed content in an Institutional library.

Continue reading “What we read this week (27 April 2018)”

What we read this week (20 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about.

I guess we wouldn’t let the week go by without mentioning GDPR. Digiday write about GDPR may change Facebook and advertising:

The GDPR is coming and will change Facebook ad targeting

Other things that caught our attention include:

 

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

What we read this week (13 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about.

The future of scientific article formats

Following on from James Somers excellent piece in the Atlantic about the future of scientific papers.  Luis Pedro Coelho has put together a more pessimistic, but probably more realistic, response suggesting that the future of the scientific papers is probably a PDF. In a slightly older post Björn Brembs outlines the seven functionalities that he thinks the scholarly literature should have. Björn makes some good suggestions and submission should be easier.  We did some experiments many years ago with a “people who read this article also read this” service but it was a flop. TrendMD’s more sophisticated recommendation algorithms work much better for BMJ. How to best support for TDM is something we would really like input from the community on.  Continue reading “What we read this week (13 April 2018)”

What we read this week (23 March 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

Visit Pubtechgator to find more publishing technology news stories.

How to listen to BMJ articles using Firefox

Hat tip to M.G. Siegler for alerting us to the narrate feature in Firefox. To listen to a BMJ article in Firefox:

  1. Go to a BMJ article for example: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/12/e017917
  2. Go to the Reader View by clicking on the Reader View reader mode icon 57 icon in the address bar
  3. Then click on the “Narrate” button on the left hand side
  4. Listen and visually follow along to the text. You can change the voice to have a British or American accent.

 

Things we read this week (5 January 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. Check back every Friday for a new post.

  • Research Workflows
    Investing in researcher workflow tools is an obvious next step for publishers seeking to increase revenues. It’s not hard to imagine, as Roger C. Schonfeld does, a future world in which Institutions drift into buying bundles of products and services alongside their institutional subscriptions. I think it’s more useful to follow Hax’s Delta model (see below) and think of these as total customer solutions strategies rather than lock-in strategies. A bundle which includes journal subscriptions, a research evaluation tool, an institutional repository and a reference management tool thrown in for free is likely to be cheaper and more efficient than purchasing and running all of those products from different vendors. Although this is likely to lead to lock-in/competitor lock-out.
    The “Delta Model” of Arnoldo Hax ...Not sure what Researcher Workflows are? Terry Clague also has a useful post trying to define the term “researcher workflow”.  LabWorm’s roundup of the Top 17 trending research tools/sites of 2017 that were most appreciated and used by the LabWorm community is an interesting insight into what researchers are actually using. (H/T: @pluto_network). Not on LabWorm’s list is ContentMine  which claims to provide tools for getting papers from many online sources, normalising them, then processing them to lookup and/or search for key terms, phrases, patterns, statements, and more – something to try next week.

Continue reading “Things we read this week (5 January 2018)”

2017 in review: Pubtechgator’s most read stories

Just before we head into 2018 here’s a look back at what’s been happening on Pubtechgator this year. Here are the top ten most read stories for 2017, covering various topics including the impact of the ‘digital duopoly’ hoovering up 60% of global digital ad market, a new cryptocurrency for investigative journalism, changes at PLOS, augmented reality, automated journalism, chatbots and a smartwatch that uses your body heat to charge. Continue reading “2017 in review: Pubtechgator’s most read stories”

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing platforms (Updated 16 April 2018)

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. Publishers like Elsevier, Springer, and John Wiley who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. If we’ve got something wrong or you want to add a platform please let us know via the comments. Continue reading “An A-Z list of scholarly publishing platforms (Updated 16 April 2018)”

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