What we read this week (30 November)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

Academic research and Open Science

Innovation

  • How Amazon Innovates
    “At the heart of how Amazon innovates is its six-page memo, which is required at the start of every new initiative. What makes it effective isn’t so much the structure of the document itself, but how it is used to embed a fanatical focus on the customer from day one. It’s something that is impressed upon Amazon employees early in their careers.”

Around the web

 

The new vet careers hub, My Vet Future, has now gone live

The new vet careers hub, My Vet Future, has now gone live and will be launching officially at the London Vet Show.

myvetfuture.com sits within the Vet Record Careers site and includes editorial content and resources from Vet Record and BVA, as well as contributions from affiliated groups such as the British Vet Nurses Association, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and the Veterinary Schools Council. Content includes careers advice for school students and veterinary undergraduates, extramural studies opportunities, and career development guidance for veterinary professionals at all stages of their careers. The site is built around eight personas, with content targeted by user type.

What we read this week (26 October)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

Open access

Blockchain

Ian Mulvany has some useful notes from the RAVE publishing conference where Blockchain seems to have been discussed at length. The Columbia Journalism Review has a nice summary of a meeting about what can blockchain actually do for journalism which discusses many of the same issues. The final comments,

“Ultimately, the panel said, the fate of blockchain journalism may hang on on whether the community of journalists keeps asking the hard questions about how to ensure that blockchain-based journalism serves and informs the public—and that control of the technology doesn’t fall into hands of the few.”

echo Ian’s reflection, “The claim of independence, in my mind does, not hold water. I think that would lead to vendor lock in as I don’t think that publishers will implement this tech on their own, without some standardisation we are going to end up depending on a vendor.”

Innovation

Bill Buxton explains why Marcel Proust and TS Eliot can be instructive for computer scientists, why the long nose of innovation is essential to success in technology design, why problem-setting is more important than problem-solving, and why we must remember, as we design our technologies, that every technological decision we make is an ethical decision as well in the Microsoft Research Podcast.

And finally…

A pair of smart glasses that you might actually want to wear:

BP success in the international W3 Awards!

Following an announcement by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts (AIVA), we are pleased to reveal that the BMJ Best Practice App, as well as the Best Practice website, has been named Silver Winners in the W3 Awards (Website Features – Best Practices, and Mobile Features – Best User Experience).

The app and the website were selected as winners out of 5,000 entries received from across the globe, after demonstrating a standard of excellence for user experience, with innovative design and user-centred functionality.

“The creativity and quality of this season’s entries surpassed even our grandest expectations. As the digital landscape continues to expand and break new ground, our winners are a testament to the creative capability that makes the internet a true work of art.” said Derek Howard, the director of the AIVA.

Read more.

What we read this week (28 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and peer review

Continue reading “What we read this week (28 September 2018)”

What we read this week (21 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. This week the links are dominated by comments about Plan S but we wanted to give a shutout to the latest Trends report from Future Today Institute which contains all sorts of interesting Publishing Tech.

Plan S

Continue reading “What we read this week (21 September 2018)”

What we read this week (14 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Peer review

Artificial intelligence and machine learning

Continue reading “What we read this week (14 September 2018)”

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