BP success in the international W3 Awards!

Following an announcement by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts (AIVA), we are pleased to reveal that the BMJ Best Practice App, as well as the Best Practice website, has been named Silver Winners in the W3 Awards (Website Features – Best Practices, and Mobile Features – Best User Experience).

The app and the website were selected as winners out of 5,000 entries received from across the globe, after demonstrating a standard of excellence for user experience, with innovative design and user-centred functionality.

“The creativity and quality of this season’s entries surpassed even our grandest expectations. As the digital landscape continues to expand and break new ground, our winners are a testament to the creative capability that makes the internet a true work of art.” said Derek Howard, the director of the AIVA.

Read more.

What we read this week (28 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and peer review

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What we read this week (21 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. This week the links are dominated by comments about Plan S but we wanted to give a shutout to the latest Trends report from Future Today Institute which contains all sorts of interesting Publishing Tech.

Plan S

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What we read this week (14 September 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Peer review

Artificial intelligence and machine learning

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Results of our survey about inviting patient and public reviewers to review research

For a couple of years The BMJ has been routinely inviting patient and public reviewers to review research papers alongside academic peer reviewers. This week BMJ Open published the results of our survey about their experience of being involved in the peer review process (https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/9/e023357). Feedback from reviewers has been extremely positive and they welcome the opportunity to include the patient voice in the research process.

What we read this week (31 August 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. Eclectic mix of items as we catch up from our holidays.

Technology and publishing

Publishers’ are increasingly closing down their Chatbots reports Digiday: “The Guardian shut down its chatbot on Facebook’s Messenger earlier this year “in line with our strategy to engage more with readers on our own platforms. We remain committed to experimenting with ways to deliver the best of our journalism according to our readers’ changing habits,” said a spokesperson.”

Google has announced a new markup system that’s going to make content more accessible through voice search. he search giant has been working with schema.org to create a new markup property that allows you to wrap parts of your content in tags that Google can ‘read’ aloud to users for relevant queries, much like an audible version of instant answers.

Digiday report on a new study by Chartbeat which shows that only a third of publishers actually see clear evidence of a traffic increase from Google’s AMP services. The study looked at 159 publishers that adopted AMP in 2017. Most were U.S. publishers and represented a mix of national, local, news and lifestyle.

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