What we read this week (5 July)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Science

Blockchain

  • The bloxberg infrastructure, a secure global blockchain established by a consortium of leading research organizations to provide scientists with decentralized services worldwide, has launched. “The bloxberg Consortium aims to fosters collaboration among the global scientific community, empowering researchers with robust, autonomous services that transcend institutional boundaries. For example, with consented transactions on the bloxberg infrastructure, research claims need not be limited to one institution alone, but can be confirmed by the whole trusted network.”
  • BMJ’s Helen King has an excellent round-up of publishing related blockchain projects,  Blockchain in Publishing and Open Science, What’s the state of play?
  •  The Blockchain for Peer Review initiative and Publons are organizing a seminar to discuss the following:
    • Can we develop common standards in order to improve the transparency, efficiency, recognition and transportability of the peer review process?
    • What is the ideal technology and infrastructure to achieve that, and how can we prevent the duplication of effort? Is blockchain the preferred solution, or would we prefer centralized services? Or perhaps a combination of the two?

And finally…

John shares his take on what makes the difference between success and failure: “Objectives and Key Results, or OKRs, are a simple goal-setting system and they work for organizations, they work for teams, they even work for individuals. The objectives are what you want to have accomplished. The key results are how I’m going to get that done. Objectives. Key results. What and how. But here’s the truth: many of us are setting goals wrong, and most of us are not setting goals at all. A lot of organizations set objectives and meet them. They ship their sales, they introduce their new products, they make their numbers, but they lack a sense of purpose to inspire their teams.”

What we read this week (17 May)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

And finally…

 

 

 

Junior Web Analyst wanted

Job title: Junior Web Analyst

Location: London, Euston

Salary: £34,640

BMJ Marketing are seeking a Junior Web Analyst, which sits within the Data and Analysis team. You will be responsible for maintaining and developing BMJ’s web analytics infrastructure, utilising Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager to deliver digital metrics to stakeholders.

In addition, you will produce accurate and effective reports and dashboards from across BMJ’s digital properties, to deliver dynamic insights about our online audiences.

More on LinkedIn

Hurman Gul writes about his first three months working in BMJ Technology

Looking back if I was to summarise my first 3 months at BMJ, confusion would be the best word to describe it. Moving from one company to another can be a daunting task, a plethora of questions goes through one’s mind. There are the big questions such as; What are my colleagues going to be like? Will I be appreciated? How many holidays do I get in a year? To the trivial questions such as; When do I get paid? Where’s the nearest toilet? What’s the quickest route to the office? While I was finding the answers to these questions and learning more about the technology behind the BMJ’s many products it was a challenging time for the tech department where we saw many departures. Two colleagues left within my first week, followed by another two leaving before the new year. However one thing that reassured me was that everyone was leaving after a few years of employment here, which was a positive sign.

Read more

What we read this week (29 March)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Strategy and future thinking

And finally…

  • Nice article from Forbes featuring  Patchwork, a technology platform developed by two NHS doctors, Dr Jing Ouyang and Dr Anas Nader, which helps hospitals better manage demand for NHS temporary staff (locums) which has received funding from BMJ New Ventures.

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