What we read this week (13 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

OpenCitations announced the release of the Crossref Open Citation Index (#COCI) which contains open DOI-to-DOI citations extracted from Crossref. Crossref’s really useful participation reports show what percentage of a publisher’s content has 10 key metadata elements registered. Going through BMJ’s report we found out that some of our reference deposits are failing and we need to resubmit 🙁

Continue reading “What we read this week (13 July 2018)”

What we read this week (6 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and Open Science

Slate discuss the impact of Facebook’s retreat from the news business.

There’s a great quote in this article:

“The internet is a completely different place every 18 months, and that’s been true since we launched in 1996,”

Which brings us onto  Is the Research Article Immune to Innovation? From Sarah Andrus in Scholarly Kitchen and the glacial pace of change in the presentation of scholarly articles online. Continue reading “What we read this week (6 July 2018)”

What we read this week (29 June 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing

Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) have published a preprint describing their program to screen images of accepted papers prior to publication which identified 12 manuscripts out of 83 with image concerns in two months. The screening and correction of papers before publication required an average of 30 min of staff time per problematic paper but  6 hours of journal staff time to resolve after publication. (H/T Phil Davis’s Tweet ) Continue reading “What we read this week (29 June 2018)”

What we read this week (22 June 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Blockchain

As the Frankl token sale and the Scienceroot bounty program draw near Ian Mulvany has a thoughtful piece about blockchain technology in STEM. I’ve yet to see a killer application for blockchain, I can see how a blockchain based experimentation platform which uses smart contracts, something like breadboard, could be useful but it’s a fairly niche application. Perhaps The Remarkablz  team  can build a CryptoKitties style trading game where we can trade scientists and do strange breeding experiments to see what happens if you take Mary Anning (English paleontologist) and merge her with Zhang Heng (Chinese inventor and Astronomer)… or perhaps not! Continue reading “What we read this week (22 June 2018)”

How to Build an Award Winning App?

Recently, BMJ and Box UK won two awards for our BMJ Best Practice app at the “WalesOnline Digital Awards 2018”. One, for the ‘Best Mobile App’ and the other for the ‘Best Global Reach’. This started me thinking about what does it take to build an award-winning app?

Here are my top 10 recommendations to build an award-winning app:

  1. Listen to the users – Does your idea solve their problem or provide enough value so that they want or need it. Test your idea and concept early and frequently throughout the development of your app.
  2. Ensure an app is a right solution– often people rush into developing an app before considering is it the right solution for the user. Is a website a more suitable alternative? Will the users install the app and continue to use it?
  3. Select the right technology – There are many technical options when it comes to building apps. Can you use an existing app framework? How many operating systems are you supporting? Should you use a native or hybrid app technology? Which devices should you support? The list goes on.
  4. Build the right team – Getting competent people who are able to work together is vital from developers to designers, to marketers and anyone involved in building and supporting your app. Your app will only be as good as the weakest part of the chain. Award-winning apps need an award-winning team.
  5. Good UX – If a product is not easy to use then people tend not to use it, especially if they have a better alternative. So having a clean, simple interface is paramount.
  6. Monetization strategy – The app needs to be a success from a business perspective, so choosing the right monetization strategy is crucial.
  7. Asking users to review the app – Recommendations are a major factor when convincing people to buy or use an app. Asking users to provide a review of your app after they have had a good experience using it will facilitate good reviews.
  8. Have a strong marketing plan – You can create a good award-worthy app but it will fail in the marketplace if not one knows about it. That’s why you need a strong marketing plan and team to tell everyone about your app.
  9. Continue to listen to the user – once you’ve built an app and released it, you must continue to work with your users to enhance your offering to blow away the competition. This is the difference between a nominated app and an award-winning app.
  10. Getting the investment right – building apps are not cheap. You’ll need to make sure that you don’t only have enough money to build your app but enough money to support your app and its ongoing development.

As you can see there are many components to consider when building an app, it will take time and dedication but it’s not rocket science. Good luck with your app development.

Dan Amos

BMJ Digital Strategy Lead and author of “How To Become An App Entrepreneur: Make Serious Money from Developing Great Apps

 

What we read this week (15 June 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. We’re catching up after holidays and conferences this week.

Disruptive Publishing

Frank Norman highlights some of the changes in science publishing aimed the biomedical  researcher community. Paul Bradshaw has a great summary of the #GENSummit 2018 and how AI is impacting publishing and journalism. Continue reading “What we read this week (15 June 2018)”

BMJ’s best practice app wins Best Mobile App award

Cardiff-based software development Box UK, won for its innovative work rebuilding BMJ’s best practice app used by healthcare bodies worldwide to improve outcomes. To ensure the needs of medical professionals and students remained at the heart of the new app, users were consulted throughout development. The app is now the only product in its market that provides evidence-based information in an easy-to-use yet clinically-accurate way, both offline and online.

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