What we read this week (12 July)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Product development and innovation

Technology

 

And finally…

  • Katie Sehl writes about Canadian doctors prescribing a visit to the art museum for patients to reduce stress and anxiety and increase feelings of well-being. In a partnership between the Médecins Francophones du Canada (MFdC) and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts physicians have been given prescription slips that patients can present at the ticket booth for entry.  Which reminds me that the Barbican has an exhibition on at the moment called AI: More than Human that looks like it’s worth a visit. The website claims,“this major centre-wide ‘festival-style’ exhibition explores creative and scientific developments in AI, demonstrating its potential to revolutionise our lives. Bringing together artists, scientists and researchers, this interactive exhibition offers an unprecedented survey of AI with which you are invited to engage head-on.”

What we read this week (5 July)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Science

Blockchain

  • The bloxberg infrastructure, a secure global blockchain established by a consortium of leading research organizations to provide scientists with decentralized services worldwide, has launched. “The bloxberg Consortium aims to fosters collaboration among the global scientific community, empowering researchers with robust, autonomous services that transcend institutional boundaries. For example, with consented transactions on the bloxberg infrastructure, research claims need not be limited to one institution alone, but can be confirmed by the whole trusted network.”
  • BMJ’s Helen King has an excellent round-up of publishing related blockchain projects,  Blockchain in Publishing and Open Science, What’s the state of play?
  •  The Blockchain for Peer Review initiative and Publons are organizing a seminar to discuss the following:
    • Can we develop common standards in order to improve the transparency, efficiency, recognition and transportability of the peer review process?
    • What is the ideal technology and infrastructure to achieve that, and how can we prevent the duplication of effort? Is blockchain the preferred solution, or would we prefer centralized services? Or perhaps a combination of the two?

And finally…

John shares his take on what makes the difference between success and failure: “Objectives and Key Results, or OKRs, are a simple goal-setting system and they work for organizations, they work for teams, they even work for individuals. The objectives are what you want to have accomplished. The key results are how I’m going to get that done. Objectives. Key results. What and how. But here’s the truth: many of us are setting goals wrong, and most of us are not setting goals at all. A lot of organizations set objectives and meet them. They ship their sales, they introduce their new products, they make their numbers, but they lack a sense of purpose to inspire their teams.”

What we read this week (28 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Social Media

And finally…

What we read this week (21 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Data

Innovation and strategy

And finally…

Researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia, argue that shifting body posture brought about by the use of modern technology is causing young people to develop hornlike spikes at the back of their skulls — bone spurs caused by the forward tilt of the head, which shifts weight from the spine to the muscles at the back of the head, causing bone growth in the connecting tendons and ligaments.  They say smartphones and other handheld devices are contorting the human form, requiring users to bend their heads forward to make sense of what’s happening on the miniature screens. [H/T: Washington Post]

Figure 1

What we read this week (6 June)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Health Tech

Thoughtful article by Maxine Mackintosh about the 23andMe and AirBnB partnership

Tech

Loads of interesting data in the new Ofcom report about media use and attitudes in the UK. It contains the sobering stat:
“One in three adults never use a computer to go online and one in ten only use a smartphone, an increase since 2017.”

And finally…

A chart from from 1973 in Scientific American showing that a person on a bicycle the most efficient among man and machines.  Steve Jobs said “the computer … is the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds”

What we read this week (31 May)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Research

Social media and metrics

Health Tech

Product Management

And finally…

A video from 1974 showing what kids thought the year 2000 would be like, a single European currency, voice activated doors, flat screen interactive TVs,  they will never catch on…

What we read this week (24 May)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

#scholcomm

Publishing

And finally…

 

What we read this week (17 May)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

And finally…

 

 

 

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