What we read this week (8 February)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

  • First up are two articles about commenting. The Ringer has a piece about ‘how the New York Times Cooking became the best comments section on the Internet‘ by calling the section Notes. ““The call to action was to leave a note on the recipe that helps make it better. That’s very different from ‘Leave a comment on a recipe.’”  PLOS, on the other hand, are struggling to attract comments. A new study in the Journal of Information Science found “that publishers are yet to encourage significant numbers of readers to leave comments, with implications for the effectiveness of commenting as a means of collecting and communicating community perceptions of an article’s importance.” (H/T: InfoDocket). Perhaps a tweak to the wording asking for notes rather than comments might help?

Innovation

 

 

Effect of different financial competing interest statements on readers’ perceptions of clinical educational articles: a randomised controlled trial

Our RCT on the effect of various COI statements on readers’ confidence in educational articles has just been published in BMJ Open. Conclusion:

“Doctors’ confidence in educational articles was not influenced by the COI statements. Further work is required to determine if doctors do not perceive these COIs as important in educational articles or if they do not pay attention to these statements. More meaningful COI disclosure practices may be needed, which highlight context-specific potential sources of bias to readers.”

Read the full article

What we read this week (18 January)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Open Data

Medicine

Technology

  • John Thornhill talks to Vivienne Ming, a theoretical neuroscientist, entrepreneur and artificial intelligence guru about her work in trying to make technology work for the benefit of humans on the FT Tech Tonic podcast.
  • The blockchain backlash begins, McKinsey on Blockchain’s Occam problem and its struggle to move projects out of Proof of Concept mode. We’re looking forward to what ALPSP have to say in their upcoming blockchain seminar.
  • Screens might be as bad for mental health as… potatoes “In the latest issue of Nature Human Behavior, Przybylski and coauthor Amy Orben use a novel statistical method to show why scientists studying these colossal data sets have been getting such different results and why most of the associations researchers have found, positive and negative, are very small—and probably not worth freaking out about.”

What we read this week (11 January)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

And finally…

We liked this infographic of The 20 Internet Giants That Rule the Web showing how much has changed over the last 20 years. (This ranking uses ComScore data which is focused on the U.S. and looks at unique visitors/viewers). Our guess is that a similar chart for academic publishing would show surprisingly little change.

The 20 Internet Giants That Rule the Web (1998-Today)

What we read this week (4 January)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

AI

Innovation

Product Manager

BMJ Careers is the place hospitals come to fill their medical vacancies. With the ability to reach doctors through our jobs board and other channels we are proud of our premium position and long heritage. We are now seeking a commercially-oriented, data-driven Product Manager to play a leading role as we build an even more successful future.

More information on LinkedIn.

What we read this week (21 December)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ Labs.

Publishing

Research

Innovation/Product management

Future thinking

And finally…

The 12 Best Computer Science Books of 2018 from @StephenPuiszis

Best Computer Science Books of 2018

Digital Delivery Manager

We are recruiting for a Digital Delivery Manager in the BMJ Knowledge Centre to lead the Digital Production team to produce, publish and translate content across BMJ Learning and Best Practice.

The successful role-holder will oversee the development of production tools and processes to ensure efficient and reliable delivery of up-to-date and translated content continuously to a number of platforms.

More information on LinkedIn.

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